Why is Nighttime Sickness Always the Worst?

I remember the first time Dean got sick during the night and Graham was out of town. I called my cousin, and she came over to calm me down and told me, “It is always worst at night. Everything will look better in the morning.” That could not be truer. Last night was a great example.

After two days of coughing and a runny nose, last night, his breathing started getting bad: he had chest retractions and belly breathing.  In order to keep an eye on him, we brought him into bed with us so we could observe him closely and give him his albuterol inhaler.

We went through my 5-step checklist to assess if we needed to take him to the ER, and we decided to wait. It is hard to make thoughtful decisions when you are a half-asleep zombie. Today, in the light of day, he looks much better. He is still belly breathing but acting like himself. He had an appetite today, which is a great sign.

However, as the sun sets this evening, I’m sure everything will seem more urgent and scary.

Remember, everything is temporary—even the night. Everything will look clearer in the morning.

One thought on “Why is Nighttime Sickness Always the Worst?

  1. Julia says:

    What is your 5 step check list? Would be helpful to see what you watch for. I know as a parent everything seems really bad and I tend to over analyze. The couple of times we have been to the ER, the doctors makes it seem like it’s no big deal, not sure if that’s annoying or helpful. Thought you might have more insight as it seems you have spend a bit of time in the hospital ( which I hope is not your normal in the long run!).

    BTW, loving the topics you are talking about here. I cannot believe how much all three of you have been through. You are a great inspiration!

    X Julia

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